Sunday, March 25, 2007

discoveries

While searching for goofy images to convert into a smallish sidebar ad for my book (something you, Dear Reader, might consider sticking on your blog if you feel so inclined), I stumbled upon a page by Vladimir Tikhonov, whose interests seem, in some ways, to parallel my own. In terms of religious studies, I mean-- not scatology. I'll be slapping a text link to his site on my sidebar.

Also of interest is this essay I found. It's by a self-described Mexican Catholic attending the University of Alberta. The essay relates his experience at a four-day Buddhist prayer retreat on Cheju Island.

Another discovery along the way: Bob the Angry Flower explains "its" versus "it's." Thank God someone tackled this.


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4 comments:

Horace Jeffery Hodges said...

Thanks, Bob the Angry Flower! I see the cute "ess" on that little bit just a lot more clearly now.

I still have a question for "Bob's Quick Guide," though. Is "Bob's" a possessive or a contraction?

I hope that this isn't a really stupid question. I guess that its a risk, but every risk presents us with it's opportunity.

Jeffery Hodges

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Addofio said...

On the essay on the meditation: the kneeling position he describes was used as a punishment in the Ghanaian school in which I taught while in the Peace Corps. I don't think even the headmaster, who had no qualms about handing out punishments (caning was another common punishment, and he caned students on a regular basis) ever made anyone kneel for more than an hour. So, reading the essay, I was right there with his mind, thinking "Why would you put yourself through that?" He has more guts than I would even aspire to.

On its vs. it's: Shucks. I know the usage; I was hoping for an explanation of the reason for the usage, a rationale. Or at least an explanation of the origins of the convention. Given that "its" as the possessive violates the normal rule for singular possessives.

Horace Jeffery Hodges said...

Singular possessive pronouns don't use an apostrophe with the ess. Think of "his" or "hers."

But now, you've got me wondering about the history of the apostrophe.

Jeffery Hodges

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Horace Jeffery Hodges said...

I've found some material on the apostrophe and have blogged on it today.

Jeffery Hodges

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